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844 miles/hour!!!

RedBull
February 5, 2013

Final Data from Austrian Felix Baumgartner’s Supersonic Freefall Released

Austrian Felix Baumgartner's supersonic freefall from the edge of space on October 14, 2012 reached an even faster speed than originally estimated: Mach 1.25. The statistic was just part of the news shared in a report detailing the results of a three-month-long analysis of mission data conducted by the Red Bull Stratos science team.

The wide-ranging science findings, including the first physiological data ever captured from a human freefalling faster than the speed of sound, also led to some revisions in the initial figures from the jump, which collected knowledge for future aerospace travel while breaking numerous records.

Baumgartner's record-breaking maximum vertical speed was revised upwards to 1,357.6 kmh / 843.6 mph / Mach 1.25 from an initial estimate of 1,342.8 kmh/ 833.9 mph/ Mach 1.24. With the help of additional data recorder analysis, the jump altitude was revised slightly down to 38,969.4 m / 127,852.4 ft from the previous estimate of 39,045 m/ 128,100 feet.

The Austrian adventurer's freefall demonstrated that, with the right equipment and proper training, a human being can safely accelerate through the sound barrier. That is a vital breakthrough for the aerospace industry as it looks for answers to the questions of crew and passenger escape in emergency situations, especially with commercial space travel on the horizon.

The documentation was finalized after the mission's science team conducted a private peer review, the Red Bull Stratos Scientific Summit, at the California Science Center on January 23, 2013, where the attendees included NASA astronauts, U.S. Air Force officers, and representatives from commercial aerospace companies such as Virgin Galactic, Northrop Grumman, SpaceX, XCOR, Sierra Nevada Corporation and more.

For more information, check out http://www.redbullstratos.com/science/scientific-data-review/

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